‘Becoming’ Worth the Read

Back to Article
Back to Article

‘Becoming’ Worth the Read

Katrina Bucher, Staff

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Print Friendly, PDF & Email

We’ve all been asked the icebreaking question- if you could eat dinner with someone, dead or alive, who would it be? Well, my answer has never differed from Michelle Obama, the 44th first lady of the United States. Her strong-willed advocacy for education and health paired with her undeniably charming personality made me fall in love with her. I couldn’t have been more excited to read her autobiography, Becoming, which dives into her childhood, relationships, and life in the white house. 

The book begins with Obama digging into her youth in the first section of the novel, “Becoming Me.” Her candid yet intellectual tone attracts all ages of readers as she describes figuring out life in the South Side of Chicago. Obama cleverly contrasts cheerful anecdotes varying from piano lessons to throwing punches in elementary school with more serious memories such as her father’s diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Obama allows for the reader to peek into her emotional upbringing and is a perfect way to start off the book. Not only are her family members fantastic and entertaining characters, but they perfectly offset Obama. 

The book then transitions into the next section, “Becoming Us,” focusing on her relationship with 44th president of the United Stated Barack Obama. Obama opens the reader’s eyes not only to the serious aspects of their tight-knit relationship but incorporates her not-so-great first impression of Barack when the charming law student was late to their first day of work. Without giving too much away, Obama impressively delves into the pair’s struggles as Barack’s growing political career strained their marriage, and how they were able to overcome their insecurities, unveiling an entire new light on their relationship. Relationships require lots of work and understanding, even between the president and the first lady. 

The book wraps up by discussing the transition of the Obamas’ into the white house. Obama not only describes the difficulty of the change of scenery, but also the incredibly rigid mold she felt she had to fit into as first lady. From being judged on her clothing choices and physical appearance, Obama unpacks the difficulty of being the first black lady of the United States, and how she had to make the role her own. 

Michelle Obama has, once again, made me respect and admire her more than any political figure. If you have ever wondered about life in the White House and the behind-the-scenes work of leading a political family, you should definitely check out Becoming.