Effectiveness of Comet Culture Lessons

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Effectiveness of Comet Culture Lessons

Katrina Bucher, Staff

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“Be. Do. Create. YOUR BEST.” CHS senior Comet Culture leaders wear this motto proudly on their royal blue shirts as they deliver monthly thought-provoking lessons to students. Comet Culture lessons approach typical teen issues varying from stress to mental health, but are they appealing and entertaining to their targeted audience?

Comet Culture is guided under the direction of social studies teacher Yetta Nowak and business chair Tracy Rehmert; the program was created to bring the diverse student body of together.

“The school was becoming much more diverse, and [the administration] were looking for ways to pull students together to talk about issues that may…not fit into the academic curriculum,” explained Nowak.

Despite these good intentions, some upperclassmen believe that the lessons don’t really spark much discussion.

Senior Jacob Sakk thinks that lessons tend to be ineffective, and that they may not be the best way to tackle issues.

“I don’t really like them, I feel like they’re a waste of time. Usually nobody pays attention, but that could just be the older students,” commented Sakk.

However, newer faces to CHS have a different impression of the lessons. Sophomore Ravi Haviz appreciates the lessons and feels that they help the younger classes transition.

“I know a lot of people think they’re dumb, but honestly it’s nice to talk about topics that are swept under the rug once a month. Especially this year with the technology lessons, they were helpful to new students,” stated Haviz.

Ms. Nowak realizes that the reception of lessons varies from student to student but hopes overall that the result is discussion.

“A lot of it [effectiveness of the lessons] depends on the students and how willing they are to be vulnerable. Our main goal is to… start conversation,” stated Nowak.