The Comet

SAT: Required or Not?

Noor Raza, Staff

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Students across the United States are busy preparing for the upcoming standardized test that might or might not determine their future. SAT: the word that sends a shiver down every junior’s spine. 

The SAT is a very important test for students who wish to go to college, and every junior across the nation strives for a good score so that they are given the hope of attending a top college or receiving the benefit it offers. 

Although it has its benefits, some students think SAT should be optional and shouldn’t be a factor in determining college acceptance. They believe that there is a limit to what SAT exams can tell an admissions officer about them. 

Other students, however, feel as if SAT should be required because sometimes it’s the only hope they have to being accepted to college.  

“If I didn’t have the best grades, I’d definitely rely on the SAT. Some students have their reasons for not having good grades and it’s okay. SAT is the deal breaker because it lets colleges differentiate between students even if it’s not a fair justification,” junior Josh Arndt said. 

Arndt sympathizes with the students who don’t do that well in school. He feels that some do have their reasons, and sometimes it isn’t their fault. SAT should be required to give those students a chance to prove themselves to admission officers. It creates competition between applicants and gives that student the chance to be accepted into a top college. 

CHS SAT math prep teacher Rebecca Mello, explained that it’s hard for colleges to separate student’s applications based on personal issues. 

“I am not entirely sure how they might even do that. I think that if the student can do really well on the SAT then that will stand out to colleges,” she explained. 

Mello feels the same as Arndt since she talks about how good scores on the SAT would help with college admissions process. And obviously, separating application and personal is hard to do. The only way for colleges to understand the correlation between SAT scores and bad grades is the essay you provide them when applying.  

Ray Brown, dean of admissions at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, advocates that “standardized exams, if treated properly, do have their place in the admissions process.” 

The SAT does have its place in the admissions process, but is it a fair factor? 

“Colleges value the SAT because it’s a way to compare student abilities and potential across the country by using the same measurement. High schools have so many different levels of courses that utilizing GPA alone, isn’t a clear picture of student ability that can be compared equally,” counselor Brittany Watkins said.  

Ms. Watkins feels the SAT is a major addition to a student’s application. It helps the student stand out because the SAT is given to everyone and colleges can compare them based off the fact that the test has the same content for student.  

“If I study really hard for the SAT and not get a good score on the test, then that shouldn’t reflect poorly on me because it just means the test wasn’t made for me.  It shouldn’t be the main factor to eliminate me from being a possible candidate to an admissions officer,” junior Aurora Rivera-Muniz explained. 

Rivera-Muniz explains that the SAT has lost its meaning in the admission processes. It unfairly determines the fate of a student who might have the ability to succeed in whatever college s/he applies to. The student might have had test anxiety or other personal problems that caused them to score low on the SAT. Because of this, the opportunity to go to a good college is snatched from their reach. 

Hasan Khan, the author of A Case Against the SATtries to make sense of the test, explaining that “I’ve always been under the impression that understanding and interpreting information is the characteristic that makes students appealing to colleges. I fail to see how a test as systematic yet convoluted and rudimentary yet confusing as the SAT helps display those traits to college admission teams.” 

Khan explains how he’s unable to see the sense in the standardized test. He fails to see how the SAT can measure a student’s understanding of concepts when it asks complicated and confusing questions.  

So, the SAT is beneficial for some students but not so much for others. One side argues how their SAT scores would help them during college applications while the other side thinks it shouldn’t even be part of the application. Which side are you on?  

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SAT: Required or Not?