Does Social Media Influence Students?

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Does Social Media Influence Students?

Li Chen, Staff

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Do apps like Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, YouTube, or Reddit sound familiar to you? If they do, it’s probably because you’ve seen a student using one, or you know someone that is frequently on these social media platforms.  

Data from Pew Research Center shows that 95 percent of teens have access to smart phones at home. Another study done by them shows that most teens use YouTube, Instagram, and Snapchat. 

Students get access to these online platforms by having a smart phone. Due to many high schools providing Wi-Fi, it’s simple and convenient for students to just connect and get on social media.  

“I use social media often whenever I’m bored, and it doesn’t have any impact on my grades, said sophomore Jakob Wilkens. 

It is a known fact that social media plays a key role in the lives of teenagers today. They use it to communicate with friends and get lots of information, no matter whether it’s accurate or not. A report done by Common Sense Media shows teens from ages 13-17 who own cell phones has doubled from forty-two percent in 2012 to eighty-nine percent in 2018. Students all like social media and don’t think there is a negative impacthowever, Common Sense Media said that teens admitted social media distracts them from fully paying attention to people who are trying to talk to them and takes away from personal relationships. 

But teen users still disagree with that claim. 

“Social media informs me with new info that I didn’t know before. I use social media because it’s fun and keeps me entertained, said junior Anthony Shields. 

It is also a way for teens to interact. 

“Social media doesn’t have any impact on my grades and attracts lots of people my age because everyone is using it. You don’t need to put lots of effort or commitment into it to maintain an account,” said sophomore Sean Hughes.