Do High School Relationships Last?

Back to Article
Back to Article

Do High School Relationships Last?

Ashley Metzbower, Staff

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Most people believe that high school love and relationships won’t be a forever thing.  

One hundred fifty-three CHS students participated in an Instagram survey where 30% think yes, while 70% say no. According to a high school sweetheart statistic, less than 2% of marriages today were actually high school couples. 

Many people believe that in high school you don’t really know what love is or you have other things you should be focusing on rather than finding love. People change. They grow up and become different than their teenage selves with different priorities, and different perspectives on life and what they want.  

“I think high school love can last, but high school relationships are not going to,” sophomore Max Powell said. 

She talks about how her parents and even her aunt and uncle knew each other in high school. 

“People can date in high school, break up, experience the world, live their lives, then come back to each other,” she explained. 

People need to be able to do things and experience life on their own. They need independence to grow and develop into themselves.  

It is also believed that high schoolers haven’t been into the “real world” yet, and they aren’t mature enough to be in a healthy, loving relationship. 

“We struggle with stuff and finding ourselves and it’s a stressful age, but we still live in a fantasy world where a lot is given to us. We don’t know how to navigate on our own yet and when we enter the real world with someone who you’ve been playing fantasy with for so long, things change,” explained sophomore Rebekah Rykiel.  

High schoolers have a lot to focus on, such as, getting good grades, schoolwork and homework, and then college. 

“Because of our young age we are not emotionally stable. We barely know what we want in life, let alone a relationship. Also, high school is only part of the people we will meet in life. Lastly most high schoolers are afraid of conflict or don’t know how to handle it. This makes having a long-term relationship very difficult,” sophomore Rose Warner said. 

Teenagers have many hormones, it’s an awkward stage for most, but they’re stressed a lot time due to different factors, and sometimes a relationship can put more stress on them. Also, because of these reasons pointed out, it could lead to a relationship without trust and communication, which rarely last. 

On the other hand, some believe high school relationships can actually last, and they can grow old together. As a teenager sometimes people just need someone who can encourage them and push them to do better, and sometimes just need someone to make them smile and keep them happy.  

”I feel as though it can last just as long as you and the other person in the relationship are happy and having fun because since we’re young, and we still need to have fun, if we are having fun, loving each other, and motivating each other to do better things in life, then yes, I feel like it can last,” junior Marciss Lawson argued. 

Volleyball coach Lisa Nelson and her husband, special education teacher Bill Nelson, have been together since freshman year of high school, 34 years later. They have married for 22 years. 

Their secret has been “lots of mutual respect. We really like each other, and we are teammates in this journey. Keep it fun with lots of laughter,” Ms. Nelson explained on how their relationship has continued to thrive.  

“Choose a partner carefully—if they are mean to others, they will eventually be mean to you. Take things slow, don’t rush it. It’s okay to disagree, but never to be mean because you can’t take it back,” she also shared. “Communicate even if it’s difficult. If you’re not enjoying their company, even if it’s doing dumb things, like walking the dog or laundry, they’re the wrong person for you. You’ve gotta laugh every day and connect in a way that says I care, and I appreciate you.” 

But then what happens after high school? Once a couple graduates, what happens to the relationship? There are so many more people a person will meet after graduating and going into the real world. 

“Distance/going to different colleges will split people,” senior Astrid Jenson stated.  

Yet some may look the situation like sophomore Allison Lingenfelter who said, “If it’s the right person, no matter what you can always find a way to stick together!”  

In the end, it all really depends on the relationship and the people in it, how they handle things, and how they work together.