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Sugar, the Hidden Diet Danger

Nate Henry, Staff

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With all the new movies coming out this year, you’re most likely going to end up eating some sort of candy at some time while going out to see a film. With that in mind you might think about how your body reacts to all that sugar. At some point eating all your chocolate you got in one night might not seem like such a good idea. 

According to SugarScience.UCSF.edu, adding some sugar to a daily diet is fine and not harmful in any way. Yet many Americans are consuming too much sugar. Sixty-six pounds of sugar is consumed by the average American every year. This could be bad news relating to health risks like obesity, diabetes, a higher heart rate, liver problems, and many more issues you probably don’t even think about before eating that last starburst. 

With most kids in America not keeping track of sugar, obesity is a huge rising factor in America.  

“I don’t worry about how much sugar I eat; I don’t really notice any health issues either, so I don’t worry about it,” freshman Justin Mantooth said.  

Expert panels worldwide have made consistent recommendations on daily sugar intake. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 6 teaspoons (25g) of added sugar per day for women and 9 teaspoons (38g) for men. For children, depending on their age and caloric needs, the daily sugar intake can range between 3-6 teaspoons (12 – 25g) per day said SugarScience.UCFS.edu.  

Even healthy food options may hold excess sugar. In a single Dole sliced peaches, there are 80 calories, 19 grams of carbs, 1 gram of protein, and 18 grams of sugar. (38 grams being the daily suggested amount for men).  

“I must eat at least 200 grams of sugar a day, but I stay active, so I think I should be fine,” freshman Justin Mantooth said. Being a high school athlete, you need to fuel your body with a little extra sugar (50-65 grams).  

A lot of kids don’t worry about their sugar consumption the slightest bit.  

“I don’t pay attention to my sugar consumption, I haven’t really had any health problem,s and I would say I eat a lot of food containing sugars” sophomore Grant Evenson said. 

With young kids and teenagers sugar and junk foods aren’t the worst idea. With obesity increasing in America by the day, the health risks are severe. Yet, when raising children you don’t want to limit off all junk food.  

“Time and again, the kids whose parents were very restrictive with snacks ate more treats than other kids and tried to ‘make up for lost time’ as soon as they had access to the ‘forbidden foods,” Markey recently wrote in Psychology Today.  

For every additional 150 calories of added sugar per day, the threat from diabetes rose by 1 percent.  

“People who ate the most added sugar more than doubled their risk of death from heart disease, a JAMA Internal Medicine study found,”said ABCNEWS.  The World Health Organization recommends consuming less than 10% of calories from added sugars. 

Watching your sugar and calories can also improve how you feel day-to-day a lot more than you may think.  

“The past few months I’ve been eating no junk food and candy and I feel so much healthier and have more energy than how I used to,” sophomore Rohan Akundi explained.  

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