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Does CHS Really Recycle?

Emily Vacin and Lauryl Thomas

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Every Baltimore County Public School has a recycling container in the parking lot next to the dumpster, and a company regularly empties the large container into a truck which takes the material to a recycling facility. A single-stream recycling container (a blue trashcan) is in most classrooms, and it is labeled with the universal recycling symbol.

But the recycling program at CHS seems to have mixed success. A lot of students don’t think we recycle or just don’t take it seriously; not everyone is aware of what to recycle either.

“I think the school doesn’t recycle because I’ve watched the janitors come around at 3 o’clock and dump the recycling trash into the regular trash cans they use to clean the school with,” Green cCub and science teacher Sarah Grogan commented.

Chief custodian Bryan Epps disputes that claim, however.

“Baltimore county is one of the largest recycling contributors, and it is a mandate from the county to recycle; of course, CHS recycles, and if we didn’t the school would get in trouble,” explained Mr. Epps.

The trouble is that recycling bins become contaminated when students put food or other non recyclable objects in it so it must be thrown away with the trash because it is not recyclable. Bins that aren’t contaminated get recycled. People’s lack of knowledge of the recycling program makes the custodian’s job harder and makes them recycle less.

According to the Green Club, there are ways we can start recycling more in the school and hopefully spread it through our communities outside of school.

“How we could help encourage students to recycle is provide all class rooms with containers and make songs on about what to recycle,” Ms. Grogan suggested.

More ways to encourage the students to recycle are have a recycling contest with each of the homerooms, or decorate the recycling bins and use recycling in art classes and have teachers talk about it to students to spread awareness.

“We can start recycling more by sending letters and petitions in the school. If we encourage recycling in the school students will be more likely to do it at home and spread it in their communities,” senior Victor Toole said.

If made more aware of what to recycle, then students and staff wouldn’t contaminate the recycling and the school would recycle more effectively.

The things you can recycle are : aluminum, steel, paper, jars, glass bottles, and plastic. The things that are not recyclable are : food, tissue paper, styrofoam, plastic grocery bags and bottle caps.

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The Student News Site of Catonsville High School.
Does CHS Really Recycle?