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The Curse Disease

Vicki Zhang, Staff

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As you walk in the hallway in school, what do you hear? “F*ck”, and other curse words are among the mix. Teachers, and even some students, are surprised to hear their students speak such profanity. Do you ever wonder why students curse and what triggered this “curse disease”?

According to Know Myself, emotional pain is a big reason why people curse today. Believe it or not, cursing can be used to ease stress. People can also curse when they are happy and overly excited. Swearing can be used as a way to balance our emotions. Sometimes, people need something to help them calm down, and swearing is their solution.

“I think people may curse as a way to relieve their anger or stress they feel at the moment,” sophomore Eden Beyene expressed.

Cursing can have many meanings in life. Many people think that cursing isn’t necessary, and curse words shouldn’t be said out loud. Most of the curse words originated from other languages with a similar definition. For example, the “F” bomb traces back to Norwegian fukka and Swedish focka, which both mean “to copulate;” this is also the meaning of the “F” bomb today.

“In this generation, there are people constantly cursing everywhere and the words mean nothing anymore because people overuse them,” sophomore Richard Hughmanick described.

According to The Atlantic, writer Jen Doll has experienced something similar. At first, cursing was a big deal for Doll and her family would count each time someone cursed. Nowadays, most people (Doll included) are over it all; even her parents adopted it. The writer explained about two groups of curse word users today: they either stopped saying them because the words lost their power, or people say them for the same reason.

Others also think that cursing is unnecessary, but they recognize it as a way to display true feelings.

“Curse words aren’t necessary, but they’re useful tools when we’re trying to express anger, though they are given as unprofessional connotation,” sophomore Robbie Gorey explained.

According to the Baltimore County Public School Student Handbook, students could be punished for abusive language and profanity in schools because the use of profanity could have a bad impact on students.

Many students had been wondering if cursing should be continued despite its popularity. Cursing should still be allowed to express emotions at times, but people shouldn’t speak profanity in every word they say.

“A lot of times, my peers curse way too much, and I find it unnecessary. People have become numb to cursing and don’t realize what they’re saying,” Beyene depicted.

Teachers of CHS also think that cursing should be used the least amount possible and should only be used at a reasonable time.

“I think it can be used for impact and humor,” Tech Ed teacher Eric Lund explained, “but only at appropriate times and with minimal frequency.”

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The Curse Disease